The california gold rush essay

Feb 14, 2015 The discovery of gold nuggets in the Sacramento Valley in early 1848 sparked the California Gold Rush, arguably one of the most significant events to shape American history during the first half The California Gold Rush Essay 1637 Words 7 Pages. The California Gold Rush 5113 The California Gold Rush Before the Gold Rush of 1849, California was a sparsely populated, unimportant territory of the United States mostly inhabited by the people of The California Gold Rush The California Gold Rush was the biggest and the richest of them all, but it was no different from any of those that followed in providing the majority of its participants with much rushing and little gold.

The Gold Rush essaysThe Reshaping of California through the Gold Rush The California Gold Rush affected not only California, but also the entire outcome of our nation. It created the expansion of our nation into Western America and California. Before the Gold Rush of 1849, California was a sparsely populated, unimportant territory of the United States mostly inhabited by the people of Mexico. However, that all changed when on January 24, 1848; carpenter and small time sawmill operator James W.

Marshall discovered a gold nugget in the Gold Rush. Gold Rush The California gold rush is undoubtedly one of the major events that shaped the western United States. In a period of civil division and unrest, the gold rush brought about a renewed drive for expansion and entrepreneurship in the U. S. The California Gold Rush This Essay The California Gold Rush The california gold rush essay other 64, 000 term papers, college essay examples and free essays are available now on ReviewEssays.

com. Autor: review February 4, 2011 Essay The California Gold Rush was a period of time that brought people from around the globe to the United States desperately searching for gold. It was one of the most significant events in the history of the state of California. Prior to the gold rush, much of the literature about California described it as a romantic wilderness where freedom and wealth could be found.

For most Americans, personal narratives and travelogues by such writers as Edwin Bryant and John C. Fremont shaped their initial impressions of the area.



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