Parental fears of childbirth a literature review

Eriksson et al. (2005, 2006) reported that, in their studies, fathers with intense childbirthrelated fear tended to be older, and that questions with the highest loading factors of fathers' childbirthrelated fear concurred with the paternal childbirth fear data described in previous ethnographic analysis (Chandler& Field, 1997).

Identified fears include harm to the mother or newborn, partner pain, feelings of helplessness, lack of knowledge, and fear of highrisk intervention. Fathers often report that childbirth classes are not helpful and, in some cases, even increase their fears. Paternal Fears of Childbirth: A Literature Review. Suzanne Hanson, MSN, CNM Lauren P. Hunter, PhD, CNM, WHNP, FACNM Jill R.

Bormann, RN, PhD Elisa J. Sobo, PhD Paternal Fears of Childbirth: A Literature Review Suzanne Hanson, MSN, CNM Lauren P. Hunter, PhD, CNM, WHNP, FACNM Jill R. Bormann, RN, PhD Elisa J. Sobo, PhD To date, most studies on paternal childbirth fears have been exploratory or descriptive, conducted outside of the United States, and focused mainly on White, firsttime fathers.

Identified fears include harm to the mother or newborn, partner pain, fe UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones The Influence of Parent Factors on Child Perfectionism: A CrossSectional Study A review of the literature by Hanson et al. (2009) identified paternal fears including: harm to the mother or newborn, partners' pain, feelings of helplessness, lack of knowledge, and concern about highrisk interventions.

Parents commonly mention fear of side effects as a reason for not vaccinating their children, e. g. in Liberia, 7 Somalia 24 and Armenia. 43 In some cases, if an older sibling or acquaintance's child had side effects, parents refused vaccinations for younger children.

A few documents mention that side effects become an issue when fathers or



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